KAZALCI OKOLJA

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Neutral

The indicator mainly shows unidentifiable direction of development. The majority of data were available only for a limited period and therefore, the reliable estimation of trends is not possible. The majority of arable fields in Slovenia are part of planned crop rotation, the proportion is slightly above the EU average. Cereals are predominant crops. Areas for growing green fodder and industrial plants are increasing, while the production of root and tuber crops is decreasing.

Neutral

Slovenia belongs to the EU Member States with a lower level of specialization in agriculture. This is reflected in the number of specialized farms and the surface area of agricultural land treated by these holdings. Specialized farms in Slovenia generate a smaller share of standard output than the average in the European Union, which indicates that the processes of concentration and specialization of agricultural production in Slovenia is slower than in European Union.

Good

In 2019, agriculture contributed 92.0% of total ammonia emissions. From 1990 to 2019, ammonia emissions in Slovenia decreased by 21.8%. In recent years, ammonia emissions in Slovenia have been around 15% below the limit set by accepted international commitments (20,000 tonnes per year). We are also achieving the target set by the new NEC Directive for 2020 (at least 1 % decrease compared to 2005).

Neutral

Greenhouse gas emissions from agriculture, mainly methane and nitrous oxide, decreased by 11.0% from 1986 to 2019. The largest declines occurred in pig and cattle production and in fertilizer application to agricultural crops. The rapid decline in emissions was typical of the early years of this period. After that, the decline slowed down. In 2019, Slovenia achieved the target (0.3% increase of greenhouse gas emissions compared to 2005) set by Operational programme for limiting greenhouse gas emissions until 2020 (increase by a maximum of 5% compared to 2005).

Neutral

Since 2011, the total number of varieties listed in the National List of Varieties for stubble cereals (common wheat), maize and potato decreased, while the total number of oilseed varieties increased, also due to domestic varieties listed as conservation varieties. For other crops the number of varieties remained unchanged. For rye, triticale and oats, the share of the five most common varieties is 100%. For other crops, the share of five most common varieties for each species range from 30% for potatoes to 80% for barley.

 

Bad

In Slovenia, the breeding of indigenous domestic animals is becoming less attractive, and out of 12 indigenous breed 11 are endangered. The Carniolan honey bee being the only exception. Eleven out of 14 traditional breeds is also endangered. The share of introduced animal breeds and cross-breeds with introduced breeds has been increasing. The breeds and races where the adaptation to natural conditions is the strongest are the most successful with defying the introduced breeds.

Neutral

Organic matter in soil is an important indicator of the quality of soil. In general, soil in Slovenia is well supplied with organic matter; this is evident from soil map data, which indicate that 86.2% of agricultural land contains more than 2% of organic matter, and 30.9% of land contains more than 4%. The results of laboratory analyses of soil samples taken in 2005 present a similar picture: 88.6% of samples contained more than 2% of organic matter and 37.3% of samples contained more than 4% or organic matter.

Good

Areas, prepared for irrigation, have increased from 4,554 ha to 6,673 ha in the period 2000–2019, and their share in total utilised agricultural area from 0.9 % to 1,4 %. The water consumption per hectare of irrigated land, which strongly depends on weather conditions in each year, has decreased since 2001. In the year 2019 was used 1,030 m3 of water per hectare of irrigated land, which is 27% less than the long-term average and more than three times less than in the year 2001, when 3,199 m3/ha was used.

Good

In the period 1992–2019 nitrogen surplus in Slovenian agriculture decreased. Trend analysis for this period shows that gross nitrogen surplus decreased on average by 1.6 kg N/ha per year or by 50%, and the net surplus by 1.5 kg N/ha per year or by 81%. The lower surplus was mainly due to a 46% increase in nitrogen removal by crops and a 4% decrease in nitrogen input per hectare of utilized agricultural area. A lower excess of nitrogen indicates better nitrogen management in agriculture and consequently a reduction in emissions of nitrogen compounds into the environment.

Good

The phosphorus (P) budget in agriculture declined over the period 1992–2019 (for 97%). Reduction is the consequence of a decreased P intake with mineral and livestock fertilizers, as well as the consequence of increasing the P uptake by agricultural crops. The period up to 2005 was characterized by a surplus of 10 to 15 kg per hectare while after 2005 they were mostly less than 5 kg per hectare. In the period 2004–2015, the P surplus in Slovenia (+4.5 kg per hectare) was above the EU average (+2.2 kg per hectare).


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