KAZALCI OKOLJA

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Neutral

General concentration of plant available P is (too) low in topsoil of extensive orchards, olive groves and pastures, below the optimum in vineyards and grasslands and suitable on fields. Low concentrations of P are mainly due to low natural concentrations of this nutrient in agricultural soils in Slovenia and also due to flushing. Concentrations of potassium (K) are in general higher than concentrations of P and reflect soil supply in Slovenia with K. Based on guidelines for professionally justified fertilization, the concentration of K in agricultural topsoils is good.

Neutral

In Slovenia, we cultivate slightly more than 8 ares (0.08 hectares) of arable land per capita, which is less than half of the average in the European Union (EU), which is 20 ares of arable land per capita (data for year 2019). This area did not change significantly between 2000 and 2019, which indicates that Slovenia maintains its production potential.

Neutral

The value of agricultural output in Slovenia fluctuates in the period 1995–2020, which can be a consequence of fluctuation of changes in prices of agricultural products, changes in the volume of agricultural production or changes in both. In last couple of years, the key factor is the physical volume of production, which fluctuates markedly due to changing natural (weather) conditions. Similarly, the value of agricultural output, calculated per capita, fluctuates in the analyzed period, with long-term downward trend.

Neutral

Slovenia is a net importer of food, as it does not cover its demand for agricultural products (cereals, potatoes, vegetables, fruit, pig meat and honey) with domestic production. The long-term trend shows that the self-sufficiency rate for most animal products (milk, eggs, beef and poultry) is higher and more stable, with the exception of pig meat and honey, where the rate of self-sufficiency is decreasing.

Neutral

In Slovenia, most of the consumed food (more than 70 %) is imported, only about a third is of Slovenian origin; before 2004, 40 % of the consumed food was imported. After Slovenia joined the EU, the import and export of food has increased significantly. Exports increased mainly at the expense of unprocessed agricultural products, while imports increased at the expense of processed products. More than half of the imported food (60 %) is imported from neighbouring countries (Austria, Croatia, Italy and Hungary), mainly cereals, fruit, vegetables and sugar.

Neutral

In Slovenia, the market prices follow the trends at the key agricultural markets, globally or regionally important. Market prices of grain are following the trend and the level of EU average, prices of beef are below EU average while the market prices of eggs and pig meat are above the EU average. Slovenia stands out with its market prices of milk, which are among the lowest in the EU.

Neutral

Slovenia is a net importer of food, as the value of food imports exceeds the value of exports. In recent years, food exports cover about 50% of imports. In the long run, the coverage of food imports by exports increases slightly. After Slovenia's accession to the EU, the value of food imports and exports increased significantly. Exports in value terms increased mainly at the expense of unprocessed agricultural products, while imports increased at the expense of processed products. Majority, i.e.

Neutral

Changes in the size structure show that concentration processes are continuing regarding the extent of the agricultural land, while in the area of the livestock production these processes have slowed down. Nevertheless, due to its small size on average, the competitiveness of Slovenian farms is low compared to the EU–28 countries.

Neutral

In the last decade, droughts have been slightly less intense than in the previous decade, and it is worrying that they occur most often during the growing season. Especially in the first trimester, we observe a decrease in the frequency and intensity of hydrological drought. In the period 1961–2019, the year 2003 stands out in terms of drought, which was dry in all quarters of the year. After 2000, the years 2007 and 2011 were more markedly dry.

Bad

Frequency and intensity of groundwater droughts is increasing in recent decades. 7 out of 10 years with highest annual intensity of phenomenon is classified in the period after year 2000. The highest intensity of groundwater drought was recorded in years 2012, 2002 and 2003. Regarding the duration of groundwater drought the period between years 2002 and 2004 stands out. Extreme groundwater drought most frequently occur in winter and spring while severe drought is most commonly observed in spring and summer.


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