KAZALCI OKOLJA

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Bad

Passenger car ownership in Slovenia has almost doubled over the last 20 years and has an above-average growth rate. It is closely connected to the use of passenger cars. Since 2008, passenger car ownership in Slovenia has been growing more slowly as a result of the economic recession. Also, motorisation level (expressed in the number of cars per thousand inhabitants) in Slovenia exceeds the average rate of motorisation in the EU as well as in numerous more economically developed EU countries.

Bad

The average age of passenger cars in Slovenia increased from 6.8 years in 1992 to 9.4 years in 2014. The structure of passenger cars by age changed as well. The number of passenger cars older than 12 years more than doubled in 2015 in comparison to 2001. Also, the share of passenger cars aged less than three years decreased by almost a half during this period. The share of heavy duty vehicles and the share of mopeds and motorcycles older than 12 years has also increased since 2009, while the share of these vehicles under three years of age decreased in the same period.

Bad

The introduction of biofuels in Slovenia and the objectives in this area are lagging behind the referential values set out in the EU Directive on the promotion of the use of biofuels and other renewable fuels for transport. Slovenia explains the deviations from the referential values with the limited possibilities for biofuel production, the discrepancies between the prices of mineral fuels and biofuels and the burdening of biofuels with excise duties, which creates market conditions that do not stimulate consumers to use biofuels.

Bad

The share of household expenditure on personal mobility remains relatively stable over time. High income groups and people from economically developed countries spend more money on car purchases and personal mobility in comparison to low income groups and people from less economically developed countries. In 2014, the share of personal mobility in the expenditure of households in Slovenia was about 16%. Of this, about 12% was spent on the functioning of vehicles and about 3% on the purchase of vehicles. Only around 1% was spent on public transport.

Bad

In comparison with the European average, the levels of transport charges in Slovenia are relatively low. The charges for the road freight transport subsystem are somewhere at the average level, while in the rail freight transport subsystem substantially below the average level of other European countries.

Neutral

In 2015, prices of motor fuels have been decreasing. In comparison to year 2014, the real prices of diesel D2 decreased by 14.5%, the price of NMB 95 by 16.6% and the price of LPG by as much as 20.7%. Prices of motor fuels are directly influenced by price developments in the wider European market, changes in taxation and the introduction and opening up of markets.

Good

The decrease in SO2 emissions from transport is significantly influenced by the tightening of legislation governing the concentration of sulphur in liquid fuels (since 2009, it has been limited to 10 mg/kg for both petrol and diesel). The limit value of concentration of sulphur in fuels used in road transport in 2015 was not exceeded in Slovenia or in the EU-28; the same applies to air and maritime transport.

Bad

The main source of environmental (ambient) noise is transport. Road traffic is the most widespread source. Percentage of the population exposed to different noise levels is high. People in urban areas are exposed to the highest levels of noise, because of concentration of population and traffic in the cities. Most worrying is a significant increase in noise at night, because people are most sensitive to noise at that time.

Good

Sustainable mobility planning at regional and local level has been rapidly gaining ground in the last decade. After joining the EU, this integrated approach to transport planning began to be implemented in Slovenia as well, and in the last decade the development of this area has experienced rapid progress. Nowadays, more and more municipalities respond to the incentives of the EU and of the Ministry of Infrastructure and are preparing and implementing Sustainable Urban Mobility Plans (SUMP), which are the central tool of the Sustainable urban mobility planning.


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